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Thirteen moons is a reference to the natural cycle of time. For every trip the Earth makes around the sun, the moon makes thirteen trips around the Earth. Thus “13 Moons” represents the wholeness of the natural world and its seasonal rhythms.

Indigenous peoples marked time by the moon for millennia and had wonderful names for them, including: Moon When the Geese Lay Eggs (Cheyenne), Little Moon of Deer Horns Dropping Off (Kiowa), Moon When Buffalo Cows Drop Their Calves (Sioux), Corn Popping Moon (Winnebago), Moon When Birds Fly South (Cree). Shoulder to Shoulder Around the Fire Moon (Wishram), and Moon When the Trees Crack Because of the Cold (Lakota).

The Gregorian calendar that we follow today was decreed by Pope Gregory XIII on February 24, 1582 by papal bull. The Gregorian calendar reformed the Julian calendar, which, in turn, reformed the Roman calendar. I believe these calendars come between us and nature. They separate us from the natural rhythms of the earth and keep us from looking to the sky to find our bearings in space and time. There is a movement afoot to reform the calendar and synchronize it to our lunar, solar, and galactic reference points. Check out the Flash animations on this page, and a 13-moon calendar will make perfect sense.

The name “13 Moons Farm” affirms our connection to the Earth and its place in the universe. It acknowledges the natural rhythms that affect our everyday lives. If I could figure out a way to live every day of my life by a 13 moon calendar, I’d do it in a heartbeat. I wish we all could